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10.18.12 Sofie’s Growing A DogBone Tree

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This morning we were out in the yard playing under the Big Tree.  We love the cool breezes and the crazy squirrels.  The leaves are falling on our heads and sticking to our feet.  We are having so much fun chewing on sticks that fall from the trees in the wind, gnaw gnaw gnaw.   Nine, the mischief cat, keeps trying to come play in the yard with us, but Mommy won’t let him.  It is fun to dig under the leaves and hide our toys.  I try to sneak bones out of the house and plant them to see if they will grow a bone tree next spring.  Louise says that is silly and the squirrels will come at night and dig them up and then eat them.  I don’t believe her.  I am going to grow a bone tree.  Mommy found one on the internet for me, so it must be real. 

Just another DogDaz morning at the zoo ❤

 
16 Comments

Posted by on October 18, 2012 in Dogs

 

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Caturday: DogDaz’ Holiday Safety List

Dec20

The cats are always amazed by the lights of the Christmas tree (which you can see reflected in the window behind Noel and Stella in this picture from 2013). K8 caught them watching the twinkling from a safe distance. Nine, of course, was climbing the tree, doing his best to undo all the wonderful decorations that everyone was putting up.

Don’t forget to celebrate the shortest day and longest night of the year (Winter Solstice) next Friday in the Northern Hemisphere. We will start to gain a bit more daylight every day from the Winter Solstice until the Spring Solstice in June.

I can not imagine a life without cats. Happy Caturday.

 

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DOGDAZ HOLIDAY LIST TO KEEP THEM SAFE

Here is a list of what to be careful of this holiday season for your cats and dogs and rabbits and guinea pigs and potbellies and ferrets, and…..

Bones – Small turkey and ham bones can lodge in the throat, stomach and digestive tract requiring surgery to remove. Also, the fats and gravies that you may add to your pets’ food can cause diarrhea and vomiting (and ultimately pancreatitis (Yuk!)).

Christmas Trees – These create a whole realm of dangers for your pet. Poorly secured trees can fall on rambunctious pets as the runaround or try to climb them. Pine needles can cause GI irritation and perforation. Sharp or breakable ornaments should be kept well out-of-the-way of curious mouths and paws. Christmas trees may contain additives and preservatives, which leach into the water and can be toxic if ingested. Tinsel, yarn, and ribbon can cause linear foreign bodies (get wrapped up throughout the intestinal tract) and create a blockage and/or possible perforations.

Electrical Cords – These are always a hazard to curious kittens and puppies but the extra lights and decorations this time of year is even more tempting. Make sure that all electrical cords are in good condition and out of reach.

Holiday Plants – Many plants can be poisonous to your pet. The holidays add a few more to that list and include mistletoe, poinsettia, lilies, and holly (the berries are especially toxic).

Lost Pets – The holidays make it easier for pets to sneak their way out of the house with the extra guests and visiting friends going in and out. Be sure to keep identification on your pets and keep them contained in a bedroom or behind a gate if you are expecting a lot of foot traffic through your front door.

Sweets– Holiday candy can cause GI problems and become toxic once ingested. Chocolate is one of the most common causes of toxic reaction in pets. The darker the chocolate the worse it is. Do not place wrapped boxes of chocolate under the tree – dogs can sniff them out. Also be sure to keep the candy dishes covered so playful paws aren’t tempted to fish them out.

Noel, The Christmas Cat
2009

Have a safe and healthy holiday!!

 Just another CATDogDaz morning at the zoo ❤

 
2 Comments

Posted by on December 15, 2018 in Cats

 

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DogDaz Guest: Post Halloween Lessons for Keeping Dogs Safe

boo2BOO! Don’t Be Scared – When all Hallow’s Eve is upon us, protecting our pets is just as important as keeping our kids safe on this night full of pranks, tricks and treats. Similar to holidays like the Fourth of July, or any other event full of loud noises, bright lights and unusual, out–of-the-ordinary colors, Halloween can be frightening for some pets.

A constant stream of strangers showing up at our doorstep, knocking, banging and ringing the doorbell, combined with the unfamiliar sights and sounds coming from outside our front door, can be alarming for some animals. On the other hand, my dog is overjoyed to see people constantly coming to the door since my slightly spoiled canine believes these trick-or-treaters have arrived for no other reason that to play and be petted, not receive candy.

Out and About – Many families dress up as a group for Halloween and this includes putting their canine in costume and taking them out for all of the festivities. When you’re considering an outdoor outfit for your pet, look for those with reflective tape, like skeleton costumes with glow-in-the-dark bones. Even if your pet’s couture isn’t illuminating, consider including bright colors, battery-powered lights or reflective items to make them easier to be spotted in the dark.

Think about different dogs and cats filmed for TV shows, commercials and movies. You may not have noticed, but they’re almost always lighter-colored animals. That’s because they’re more easily visible and don’t blend in with darker backgrounds. Consider yourself the director and costume designer on your Halloween set and make sure your animal doesn’t fade away from being spotted, especially outdoors during evening hours.

Deceptive Decorations – While trolling around on Halloween, it’s not uncommon to see some pretty realistic, convincing decorations that can resemble anything from rotting corpses to headless horsemen. But for anyone who has seen a crime or mystery drama on TV, sometimes these props look remarkably realistic, and in some rare cases, they are exactly as they appear despite the hype and holiday.

For example, if your dog were to come across a dead moles on Halloween, we might just laugh it off as a decorative part of a pet cemetery. But deceased animals carry a number of different dangerous diseases and significant health problems that could be easily transferred to your pet through their decaying carcasses. Keep an eye on your canine when they pay too much attention to a Halloween display.

Scary Candyland – Another part of this sweet holiday comes with the mounds of candy that can be found practically everywhere, even discarded in the streets. Pay particular attention to wrappers that could contain remains of chocolate and other dangerous threats to our pets. We all know that cocoa can be deadly for dogs and cats, but there’s another ingredient that can be even more dangerous, XYLITOL!boo3

Xylitol, an artificial sweetener found in some candies, gum, baked goods and even toothpaste, can cause consequences for our critters in smaller doses when compared to chocolate. Just like cocoa, it will take a fair amount of the particular ingredient to prove deadly, but Xylitol and chocolate can still cause significant health problems if accidentally ingested.

Don’t be overly frightened this Halloween that your pet will have problems when you can be there to help protect them from harm. With a little bit of planning and preparation, some supervision and awareness will ensure we all have a great time during all Hallow’s Eve.

Hope You Had A Happy Halloween Everyone!

Guest post by: Amanda Kingsley exclusively for DogDaz.com

 
4 Comments

Posted by on November 4, 2016 in Dogs

 

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DogDaz Zoo: Bringing Home A New Rescue – Part 1

Puppy Sofie

Puppy Sofie coming home in a large tub because I didn’t have a carrier.

My coworker rescued 2 cute beagles the other day and asked me what I recommend he does to get them settled. Well, that made me think about all the things I wish I knew with my first few rescues.  I started to put together a list that I thought maybe you all could add to and comment on.  What would you tell a new rescue owner (these dogs were not puppies (which has its own set of issues))?  These are in no particular order except for the first one (I think that patience is the most important thing!)  What do you think is important?

  • Patience:  The dog does not know you and you her. Do not expect her to trust you or understand you yet.  Just like in any relationship, it takes time to build a rapport. Give your new friend space and time, and things will grow.
  • Accidents Happen: Count on a dog marking or having accidents the first few days, even if he was housetrained. Have pet-specific cleaning products on hand. Also be prepared for other transitional behavioral problems.
  • Positive Reinforcement Works: No one training approach is right for every dog. There are a variety of approaches based on positive reinforcement – the essence of effective training and behavior modification.
    • Start day one by teaching your dog appropriate behavior through consistent, positive reinforcement.
  • Don’t Lose Them: Keep an ID tag attached to a snug buckle collar at all times.  When you first get them they are more likely to run because they are scared.
    • Get them microchipped.
  • Be The Leader: During the transition period, the dogs need time to adjust to the rules and schedule of your household. And s/he needs your leadership! A dog is a pack animal looking for guidance, and it is up to you to teach good, acceptable behaviors. If the human does not take charge, the dog will try to.
  • Be Consistent: Dogs are creatures of habit. A consistent routine for feeding, exercising, and potty time will help your dog adjust.
  • Supervise or Restrict: A dog cannot do damage unless you let that happen. Watch your new dog during the transition period. When you can’t supervise, keep them in a kitchen, crate or other secure area with chew toys.
    • Keep dogs on-leash when outdoors in unfenced areas. Otherwise, you’ll have no control if your dog obeys instinct and chases a squirrel into the street…tussles with another dog…or runs after a child.
    • Supervise even when the dog’s in a fenced yard. If there’s a way to escape, most dogs will find it.
First day home 3.9.11

First day home 3.9.11

  • Don’t Assume They Were Trained or Socialized: Many adopted dogs have not had the luck to be socialized yet. Their baggage may include unacceptable behavior. Re-educate your dog with the help of books and qualified professionals.
    • Do not keep dogs in dark, damp basements, garages, or non-family areas; this thwarts your efforts to raise a socialized, well-behaved, house-trained animal.
  • Establish Who Is Boss: Don’t kiss your dog or place your face at the dog’s eye level before you’ve begun obedience training and established yourself and other humans in the home as higher up in the hierarchy. Dogs often perceive a face placed at their eye-level as a threat, and then bite.
    • Beware of letting your dog on your bed or furniture if you haven’t established all human family members as the leaders (“alpha”). Dominance-related problems often arise when a dog is on a higher physical level. Dogs don’t seek equality; they seek and need leadership.
  • Give Clear Instructions: Don’t issue a command unless you are in a position to enforce it. Telling a dog to do something, then not guiding him to obey if he chooses not to, teaches him to ignore you.
    • Beware of sending mixed signals that bad behavior is cute or entertaining.
    • Teach dogs good house manners from the start.
    • For the first few days you have a dog, keep him or her in the same room with you – so that if the dog needs to potty, you can rush him outdoors…and so that if he engages in unapproved behavior, you can instantly correct the dog and substitute a more positive behavior. For example, removing the shoe from his mouth, then substituting a toy and praising.
  • Be Selective With Treats: Avoid using overly desirable treats such as rawhides or pig hooves. Dogs will often fight with each other over them, and even attack people they perceive might desire their treats.  Rawhide is also very hard on their tummies.  I give them deer antlers (expensive but worth it).
  • Play nice: Don’t play tug-o-war, rough-house, or engage in other combative play. These practices may encourage aggression in a dog you do not know well and teach your dog to challenge you.
  • Realize there is always a solution to any problem – read and consult trainers.
  • Changing a dog’s name: A dog can learn a new name quickly if you use it consistently. Start by linking it with the previous name, if you can for a while.
  • Limit Visitors and New Stuff: A new dog feels bewildered and stressed by all of the changes, so surrounding her with too many people might cause her to cower or nip. So delay introductions to friends and neighbors until the dog has had a chance to settle in. (However, you can start obedience classes with a trainer right away.)
    • Make introductions one at a time, on leash for control. Exercise and calm the dog before meetings, and have treats handy to shape and reward good behavior. You may want to have the dog on leash so that you can correct immediately as needed. Make sure the visitor is relaxed, and that you convey confidence.
    • The dog may want to sniff the visitor first, before any petting. Beware: if the guest is tense, the dog may sense this as a direct challenge. So set the tone with your actions and attitude – wait until you’re happy and relaxed. Read cues from your dog: how comfortable does she appear? Many dogs love new people, while others feel overwhelmed.
  • Expect your new dog to engage in behaviors you’ll need to correct, such as growling or jumping on people. Allowing a dog to jump on people is a common mistake, but to avoid exasperation down the line, teach your dog “off” from the start. In addition, don’t let anyone engage your dog in aggressive play such as wrestling, tug of war, or play biting.
  • Set Up Good Potty Routine: Take your dog outside as soon as you wake up. If you feed him in the morning, leave him time to relieve himself after breakfast before you go to work.After you return from work, take him out immediately to potty and exercise. If he has exercised heavily, wait an hour before his evening feeding. He’ll need another bathroom break anywhere from 30 minutes to several hours later depending on his age and habits. Go out once more right before you go to bed. Withhold evening snacks.
Lulu Graduation 2010

Lulu Graduation 2010

  • Teach Them That You Will Return:  Initially, your new dog may experience separation anxiety when you leave. Using a crate can reduce accidents and other problems rooted in insecurity by providing a safe and welcome haven. Most dogs like cozy places, which is why you often see dogs resting under tables. Teach your dog from the start that “all good things happen in the crate.” Place nice bedding in the crate, along with dog toys that you can rotate for variety. Feed your dog in the crate. Give him praise and treats for venturing into the crate, and for resting there calmly.  (One of my dogs loves her crate, the other will have nothing to do with it.)
    • You can also confine your dog in the kitchen or hallway using baby gates. Jumping dogs may require you to piggyback two gates atop each other.
    • Anxiety outlet: Try a Kong rubber chew toy that lasts a long time or a hollow marrow bone. Smear the inside with peanut butter and your dog will spend hours trying to lick it out. Add dry kibble for more fun.
    • When you get ready to leave, quietly say “good dog!” and provide a small treat. Don’t say good-bye; just leave. When you return, quietly praise the dog for being good and take her out immediately.
    • Make your schedule as consistent as possible. It is not fair to get upset if a dog has an accident after being left alone a long time. One popular solution: hire a mid-day dog walker. (I have had a dog walker for years and the dogs really appreciate the mid-day break.  Then I walk them before dinner when I finish work.)
    • To work against separation anxiety, don’t spend a whole day with new dogs. This is a big mistake that dog adopters make.
      (1) Have her bed, safe chew toys and water ready in the confined area in which she’ll stay when you’re gone – whether it’s a crate or in a gated-off kitchen area. Take her to that area, tell her to lie “down,” give her a chew toy and a treat and praise, using her name.
      (2) Step away. If she remains quiet, good; don’t talk to her, because that will distract her from this desired behavior. Before she begins to grow restless, take her back outside again to play or walk.
      (3) Return her to the crate, then go into another room for longer periods.
      (4) Leave the house and come back in right away. Gradually make those trips longer and longer; vary the duration you’re out. Your dog will be less anxious as she learns that when you leave, you eventually come back.
    • Give her a treat while she’s in the crate, and talk to her while she is in the crate, so she’ll come to accept the crate. By being reliable, you’ll gain her trust – and teach her that you decide what to do.
      • In many cases it’s counter-productive to crate more than 5 to 6 hours after the transition period. But used properly, the crate is an excellent tool for you and comfort zone for your dog.  My Louise sleeps in her closed crate all night (her choice), that is her happy place.
  • A tired dog is a happy dog. Before you leave your dog for extended periods, exercise her vigorously. Then, for 20 minutes before leaving the house, go about your business calmly – then just leave. Don’t make a fuss saying good-bye.

Winter Walk

There is a great list on http://www.paw-rescue.org.  Many of these ideas came from there.

What would you tell someone bringing home a new rescue?

Just another DogDaz morning at the zoo ❤

 
15 Comments

Posted by on January 5, 2016 in Dogs

 

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Caturday: DogDaz’ Holiday Safety List

Dec20

The cats are always amazed by the lights of the Christmas tree (which you can see reflected in the window behind Noel and Stella).  K8 caught them watching the twinkling from a safe distance.  Nine, of course, was already climbing the tree, doing his best to undo all the wonderful decorations that K8 and V were putting up.

Don’t forget to celebrate the shortest day and longest night of the year (Winter Solstice) today in the Northern Hemisphere.  We gain a bit more daylight every day now until the Spring Equinox.

I can not imagine a life without cats. Happy Caturday.

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Keep the furries safe this holiday.  Here is a little reminder list of what to be careful of for your cats and dogs (and rabbits and guinea pigs and potbellies, and probably ferrets too) this season:

Bones – Small turkey and ham bones can lodge in the throat, stomach and digestive tract requiring surgery to remove. Also, the fats and gravies that you may add to your pets‘ food can cause diarrhea and vomiting (and ultimately pancreatitis (Yuk!)).

Christmas Trees – These create a whole realm of dangers for your pet. Poorly secured trees can fall on rambunctious pets as the run around or try to climb them. Pine needles can cause GI irritation and perforation. Sharp or breakable ornaments should be kept well out-of-the-way of curious mouths and paws. Christmas trees may contain additives and preservatives, which leech into the water and can be toxic if ingested. Tinsel, yarn and ribbon can cause linear foreign bodies (get wrapped up throughout the intestinal tract) and create a blockage and/or possible perforations.

Electrical Cords – These are always a hazard to curious kittens and puppies. But the extra lights and decorations give even more temptation. Make sure that all electrical cords are in good condition and out of reach.

Holiday Plants – Many plants can be poisonous to you pet. The holidays add a few more to that list and include mistletoe, poinsettia, lilies and holly (the berries are especially toxic).

Lost Pets – The holidays make it easier for pets to sneak their way out of the house with the extra guests and visiting friends going in and out. Be sure to keep identification on your pets and keep them contained in a bedroom if you are expecting a lot of foot traffic through your front door.

Sweets – Holiday candy can cause GI problems and become toxic once ingested. Chocolate is one of the most common causes of toxic reaction in pets. The darker the chocolate the worse it is. Do not place wrapped boxes of chocolate under the tree – dogs can sniff them out. Also be sure to keep the candy dishes covered so playful paws aren’t tempted to fish them out.

(list compiled with help from http://www.paws.org/holiday-hazards-for-pets.html)

Let’s all have a safe holiday season!

 Just another CATDogDaz morning at the zoo ❤

 
10 Comments

Posted by on December 21, 2013 in Cats

 

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8.12.12 Mojo, All Better

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The dogs have been really missing their best friend, Mojo, because he had bone surgery on his leg and was not able to walk with us or play for what seemed like forever in dog days.  But Mo healed quickly and he is now back to himself.  So the girls and I went over for a little romp around the yard; but, no jumping and catching frisbees until we are sure that Mojo is all healed up.  I think I have mentioned this before, but Louise does not smile for many other dogs (or people for that matter), but she always has a big smile for Mojo.  I just love it when the dogs are content.  It is so hard when an animal is hurt or sick for many reasons, but it is also frustrating because there is no way to explain to them what is going on. But I never really thought about the fact that there is no way to explain to my dogs, Lulu and Sofie, why they could not go over to play with their friend who they have walked and played with constantly their whole lives, until this event.  They knew he was still there because they heard him bark from across the street and they saw him a few times when he came out his front door for a moment or two.  It was kind of a funny waiting time until he was better. They missed him.  We are all happy that Mojo is all better now.

Just another DogDaz morning at the zoo ❤

 
20 Comments

Posted by on August 12, 2012 in Dogs

 

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